Read It And Weep

American counterterrorism experts have been hunting Osama bin Laden for years. They have spent millions of dollars, countless man-hours and considerable diplomatic capital in order to track down the mastermind blamed, indirectly or directly, for terrorist incidents ranging from last fall’s suicide attack on the USS Cole to the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Africa. Last week CIA Director George Tenet told the Senate Intelligence Committee that bin Laden’s global terror network is “the most immediate and serious threat” to U.S. national security.

Newsweek  February 19, 2001

Read It And Weep

American counterterrorism experts have been hunting Osama bin Laden for years. They have spent millions of dollars, countless man-hours and considerable diplomatic capital in order to track down the mastermind blamed, indirectly or directly, for terrorist incidents ranging from last fall’s suicide attack on the USS Cole to the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombings in Africa. Last week CIA Director George Tenet told the Senate Intelligence Committee that bin Laden’s global terror network is “the most immediate and serious threat” to U.S. national security.

Newsweek  February 19, 2001



40 Years Ago- Terror At The Munich Olympics

They slipped through the stillness of Munich’s Olympic Village an hour before dawn-eight shadowy figures, in a variety of disguises, with machine guns and hand grenades in athletic-equipment bags.

Newsweek September 18, 1972  



This Was A Very Bad Day In 1995

ONE MINUTE, THEY WERE going about the usual business of bureaucracy. The next, their lives were blown apart. Capt. Bandy Norfleet, USMC, had gone to the Marine Recruiting Command Center on the fifth floor of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building to talk about funding his station in Stillwater. Dana Bradley had gone to get a social-security card for her 4-month-old son. Across the street at the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, administrative assistant Irish Hall said the blast was instantaneous — a flash of blue lights and then her head was bleeding. For Henderson Baker II, it seemed like cons. The 34-year-old army captain had been chatting with his NCO in the fourth-floor office of the Army Recruiting Command. Suddenly, the floor blew out from under him and he was hurtling down. A hundred things flashed through his mind: “I thought about my wife and my son. I thought, ‘Was this an earthquake? Am I dying? Am I dreaming?’” Then he hit the ground and blacked out.

Newsweek May 1, 1995



'Underwear Bomber' Gets Life Sentence.  Read Our Original Coverage. 

As the Airbus 330 carrying 278  passengers and 11 crew members began its descent into Detroit on  Christmas Day, witnesses say Abdulmutallab got up from his seat by the  window in the economy section and went to the bathroom. He stayed there  for 20 minutes. When he returned, he told his seatmate that his stomach  had been bothering him. He put a blanket over his lap and tried to  inject chemicals from a syringe into a packet containing three ounces of  explosive powder that he had retrieved from his underpants. The bomb  should have been powerful enough to blow a hole in the plane. But  instead passengers heard a popping sound, like a firecracker, and saw  flames. 

Newsweek January 11, 2010

'Underwear Bomber' Gets Life Sentence.  Read Our Original Coverage.

As the Airbus 330 carrying 278 passengers and 11 crew members began its descent into Detroit on Christmas Day, witnesses say Abdulmutallab got up from his seat by the window in the economy section and went to the bathroom. He stayed there for 20 minutes. When he returned, he told his seatmate that his stomach had been bothering him. He put a blanket over his lap and tried to inject chemicals from a syringe into a packet containing three ounces of explosive powder that he had retrieved from his underpants. The bomb should have been powerful enough to blow a hole in the plane. But instead passengers heard a popping sound, like a firecracker, and saw flames.

Newsweek January 11, 2010