July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap for Mankind

At 10:56 p.m. EDT Sunday night, as perhaps 1 billion earth men and women watched and listened, the civilian commander of Apollo 11 stood on the 37-inch diameter landing pad of his Eagle craft and then carefully lifted his left foot off the saucer-shaped gear and pressed it into the Sea of Tranquility.  He was a ghostly white figure moving in buoyant ungravity on a powdery plain some 240,000 miles away- and yet as close as the TV set across the room, as real as a recurrent dream.  For with him walked all men who have ever lived or who are yet to live.

Newsweek  July 28, 1969



30 Years Ago Today, Sally Ride Blasts Into Space & History

From a systems-engineering standpoint, it is easy to identify the point where Sally K. Ride began to leave the rest of the world behind. A flow chart of her life would show the crucial decision coming one day in 1977, when — as a 25-year-old astrophysicist winding up her doctoral work at Stanford University — she spotted an announcement in the campus newspaper about openings in the astronaut program, a career she had never even contemplated for herself. In what once would have been called an epiphany — but she herself would probably describe as a go/no-go decision node — she was up and out of the room before she had finished reading the notice, one of more than 1,000 women and nearly 7,000 men to apply for what would ultimately be the 35 slots in the astronaut class of 1978. Not everyone’s life resolves itself so neatly into yes- or-no decisions, taken in an instant and never looked back upon or regretted, but, if Sally Ride’s life proves anything, it is that the very smart are different from you and me.

Newsweek  June 13, 1983

30 Years Ago Today, Sally Ride Blasts Into Space & History

From a systems-engineering standpoint, it is easy to identify the point where Sally K. Ride began to leave the rest of the world behind. A flow chart of her life would show the crucial decision coming one day in 1977, when — as a 25-year-old astrophysicist winding up her doctoral work at Stanford University — she spotted an announcement in the campus newspaper about openings in the astronaut program, a career she had never even contemplated for herself. In what once would have been called an epiphany — but she herself would probably describe as a go/no-go decision node — she was up and out of the room before she had finished reading the notice, one of more than 1,000 women and nearly 7,000 men to apply for what would ultimately be the 35 slots in the astronaut class of 1978. Not everyone’s life resolves itself so neatly into yes- or-no decisions, taken in an instant and never looked back upon or regretted, but, if Sally Ride’s life proves anything, it is that the very smart are different from you and me.

Newsweek  June 13, 1983



On This Date In 1965: The First American Spacewalk

Eyes glued to television sets, millions waited tensely to hear from astronaut Edward White as he climbed out of his capsule high over the pacific ocean.  Then came the verdict: “This is fun!” said white, and men everywhere shared his boyish glee.

Newsweek  June 14, 1965

On This Date In 1965: The First American Spacewalk

Eyes glued to television sets, millions waited tensely to hear from astronaut Edward White as he climbed out of his capsule high over the pacific ocean.  Then came the verdict: “This is fun!” said white, and men everywhere shared his boyish glee.

Newsweek  June 14, 1965



Honoring Neil Armstrong, 1930-2012

Civilian Neil A. Armstrong, 38, the Apollo commander who is scheduled to be the first man to walk on the moon, has been known to smoke a cigar and enjoy himself at parties…

Newsweek July 21, 1969