"The Angry Black Athlete"

High in the LA Coliseum stands, Tommie Smith stood in a huddle of friends.  Smith, the sprinter who holds ten world records, had just won a 200-meter dash that was one of the most important of his life.  A radioman thrust a long microphone toward him and began, “Tommy, you ran with real power out there…”  Call it black power” said Smith.  End of interview.

Newsweek  July 15, 1968

"The Angry Black Athlete"

High in the LA Coliseum stands, Tommie Smith stood in a huddle of friends.  Smith, the sprinter who holds ten world records, had just won a 200-meter dash that was one of the most important of his life.  A radioman thrust a long microphone toward him and began, “Tommy, you ran with real power out there…”  Call it black power” said Smith.  End of interview.

Newsweek  July 15, 1968



40 Years Ago- Terror At The Munich Olympics

They slipped through the stillness of Munich’s Olympic Village an hour before dawn-eight shadowy figures, in a variety of disguises, with machine guns and hand grenades in athletic-equipment bags.

Newsweek September 18, 1972  



On This Date In 1984, Mary Lou Retton Wins Gold

Gifted with a low center of gravity — and powered by stocky legs that remind sportswriters of fullbacks and tree trunks — she is the sport’s first industrial-strength performer: gymnastics in a drum.

Newsweek August 13, 1984

On This Date In 1984, Mary Lou Retton Wins Gold

Gifted with a low center of gravity — and powered by stocky legs that remind sportswriters of fullbacks and tree trunks — she is the sport’s first industrial-strength performer: gymnastics in a drum.

Newsweek August 13, 1984



On This Date In 1976, Nadia Comaneci Becomes The First Gymnast In Olympic History To Score A Perfect 10

Nadia. Her name was whispered excitedly every time she approached an exercise. On the sidelines she was restless, pacing while her competitors sat and waited, occasionally doing difficult backflips with the casual ease of a ballplayer waving a bat in an on-deck circle. Then it was time for action, and as the hush came over the capacity crowd in the Montreal Forum, all the nervousness and little-girl shyness went out of the child-heroine of the XXI Olympiad. Suddenly 14-year-old Nadia Comaneci of Romania was in complete, exhilarating command of her tiny body - and of the worldwide television audience.

Newsweek August 2, 1976

On This Date In 1976, Nadia Comaneci Becomes The First Gymnast In Olympic History To Score A Perfect 10

Nadia. Her name was whispered excitedly every time she approached an exercise. On the sidelines she was restless, pacing while her competitors sat and waited, occasionally doing difficult backflips with the casual ease of a ballplayer waving a bat in an on-deck circle. Then it was time for action, and as the hush came over the capacity crowd in the Montreal Forum, all the nervousness and little-girl shyness went out of the child-heroine of the XXI Olympiad. Suddenly 14-year-old Nadia Comaneci of Romania was in complete, exhilarating command of her tiny body - and of the worldwide television audience.

Newsweek August 2, 1976




Peggy Fleming In Action- 1968

America’s best bet for an Olympic gold medal [she won] is wrapped in a trim 109-pound package that keeps its cool on and off the ice.  The only time Peggy Gale Fleming heats up a bit is when a European restaurant can’t supply her favorite energy-building dish- macaroni and cheese.  Then the shy bambi-like teen-ager is likely to mumble a polite excuse, retreat to her hotel room, dig out a box of elbow macaroni from a suitcase and fix her own meal.

Newsweek February 5, 1968

Peggy Fleming In Action- 1968

America’s best bet for an Olympic gold medal [she won] is wrapped in a trim 109-pound package that keeps its cool on and off the ice.  The only time Peggy Gale Fleming heats up a bit is when a European restaurant can’t supply her favorite energy-building dish- macaroni and cheese.  Then the shy bambi-like teen-ager is likely to mumble a polite excuse, retreat to her hotel room, dig out a box of elbow macaroni from a suitcase and fix her own meal.

Newsweek February 5, 1968