On This Date in 1964: The Most Powerful Earthquake In U.S. History

It was a shock heard round the world- a roaring, rumbling earthquake that wrought splintering havoc in southern Alaska, set deadly tidal waves raging down the western rim of the continent, and jarred seismograph needles off their tracks on the other side of the world.

Newsweek  April 6, 1964

On This Date in 1964: The Most Powerful Earthquake In U.S. History

It was a shock heard round the world- a roaring, rumbling earthquake that wrought splintering havoc in southern Alaska, set deadly tidal waves raging down the western rim of the continent, and jarred seismograph needles off their tracks on the other side of the world.

Newsweek  April 6, 1964



Fascinating Take On The “Invisible Monster” Hurricane That Killed Up To 700 People On Long Island and New England On This Date In 1938
Newsweek October 3, 1938

Fascinating Take On The “Invisible Monster” Hurricane That Killed Up To 700 People On Long Island and New England On This Date In 1938


Newsweek October 3, 1938



Remembering Hurricane Katrina, Seven Years Ago


It wasn’t exactly a surprise. “This ain’t gonna last,” New Orleans City Council President Oliver Thomas told his security guard as they watched the waters of Lake Pontchartrain rising and racing and eating away at the dirt levee beneath the concrete floodwall built to protect New Orleans from disaster. It was 4 o’clock on Sunday afternoon, Aug. 28. Hurricane Katrina was still 14 hours away, but the sea surge had begun. Thomas returned to the city’s hurricane war room and announced, to anyone who was listening, “The water’s coming into the city.”

Newsweek September 12, 2005



On This Date In 1980, Mount St. Helens Goes Boom

With a blast as powerful as the largest hydrogen bomb ever tested, Washington’s 9,677-foot Mount St. Helens blew its top last week — the first eruption of a volcano in the contiquous United States in more than 60 years and by far the most destructive. At least 18 people died and 88 more were missing in the devastated moonscape of the mountain itself.

Newsweek June 2, 1980

On This Date In 1980, Mount St. Helens Goes Boom

With a blast as powerful as the largest hydrogen bomb ever tested, Washington’s 9,677-foot Mount St. Helens blew its top last week — the first eruption of a volcano in the contiquous United States in more than 60 years and by far the most destructive. At least 18 people died and 88 more were missing in the devastated moonscape of the mountain itself.

Newsweek June 2, 1980



On This Date In 1986, A Nuclear Meltdown At Chernobyl

The very word conjures up the horror: a reactor fire hot enough to turn metal to ooze, graphite to glowing charcoal and otherwise-controlled elements to free-floating isotopes of death. This time man’s scientific genius fused disastrously with human error at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant in the Ukraine. One reactor’s cooling system failed; the core overheated, and an explosion tore off the roof, releasing a radioactive cloud that set off radiation monitors across an entire continent. “This is by far the worst nuclear-reactor accident known to mankind,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy, after studying the intelligence briefs. “It goes beyond even the worst nightmares of nuclear scientists.”

Newsweek May 12, 1986



On This Date In 1980, President Carter Delivers Some Bad News

The United States woke up to a cold and bewildering splash of reality last Friday.  At 7a.m., a tight-lipped Jimmy Carter was explaining on radio and TV that a daring commando raid to rescue the 53 American hostages in Tehran had gone awry.

Newsweek May 5, 1980



On This Date In 1979

It began with a brief but terrible bump in the night and quickly grew into the worst commercial nuclear accident in U.S. history. At the Three Mile Island power plant near Harrisburg, Pa., a balky valve malfunctioned, setting off an intricate chain of mechanical and human failures. In the control room of the plant’s Unit II, warning lights flashed and an electronic alarm rang. Craig Faust, 32, and Ed Frederick, 29, working the night shift, studied the alarms and meters as the plant veered toward a state of emergency. They kept their heads, pushed and pulled as many as 50 buttons and levers in fifteen seconds and the reactor shut down. “What we saw we understood and we controlled,” Frederick said. But it wasn’t enough.  Read how one TMI worker escaped the disaster alive.

Newsweek April 9, 1979