The Great Elmore Leonard  1925-2013

Hard-Boiled: His books depart from the hard-boiled tradition in another way: from Hammett to Mickey Spillane, from Macdonald to Robert B. Parker, writers have generally told these stories in the first person. By jettisoning the security of first-person narration — a unified point of view, a single sardonic tone of voice, a sense of the hero in control — Leonard can let his characters breathe more easily, show us how matters seem to them. In this way, the reader knows more about what’s going on than the hero does. 

Newsweek  April 22, 1985

The Great Elmore Leonard  1925-2013

Hard-Boiled: His books depart from the hard-boiled tradition in another way: from Hammett to Mickey Spillane, from Macdonald to Robert B. Parker, writers have generally told these stories in the first person. By jettisoning the security of first-person narration — a unified point of view, a single sardonic tone of voice, a sense of the hero in control — Leonard can let his characters breathe more easily, show us how matters seem to them. In this way, the reader knows more about what’s going on than the hero does. 

Newsweek  April 22, 1985



RIP, James Gandolfini

Gandolfini’s astonishing turn as Tony Soprano has made him TV’s most unassuming superstar, as well as one of its more improbable sex symbols—a balding, barrel-chested, 260-pound hunk of burning love. (“He’s a stud,” says Gore Verbinski, who directed Gandolfini and Roberts in “The Mexican.” “Women go crazy for this guy. I think it’s a documented fact.”) Financially, fame’s rewards have been unequivocal. The former character actor reportedly signed a two-year, $10 million deal with HBO last fall, and is now asking $6 million a movie. But personally? Fame? “He’s not thrilled about it,” says costar Edie Falco. “He’s a very quiet, shy person. He keeps saying, ‘I’m not all that interesting,’ which I happen to disagree with.”

Newsweek  April 2, 2001

RIP, James Gandolfini

Gandolfini’s astonishing turn as Tony Soprano has made him TV’s most unassuming superstar, as well as one of its more improbable sex symbols—a balding, barrel-chested, 260-pound hunk of burning love. (“He’s a stud,” says Gore Verbinski, who directed Gandolfini and Roberts in “The Mexican.” “Women go crazy for this guy. I think it’s a documented fact.”) Financially, fame’s rewards have been unequivocal. The former character actor reportedly signed a two-year, $10 million deal with HBO last fall, and is now asking $6 million a movie. But personally? Fame? “He’s not thrilled about it,” says costar Edie Falco. “He’s a very quiet, shy person. He keeps saying, ‘I’m not all that interesting,’ which I happen to disagree with.”

Newsweek  April 2, 2001



Margaret Thatcher  1925-2013

"What Britain needs,” Margaret Thatcher said during the campaign, “is an iron lady.” Not all Britons agreed that a strong-willed, somewhat shrill and prickly suburban matron of determinedly right-wing views was the ideal choice to restore their country to greatness. But last week, British voters selected the redoubtable Maggie Thatcher as their new Prime Minister and gave her a clean mandate to make good on her basic campaign promise: to halt Britain’s “slither and slide toward the socialist state.”

Newsweek  May 14, 1979

Full Coverage



Tupac Shakur Died 16 Years Ago

Tupac Amaru Shakur knew so much trouble in this world, it was easy to forget that he was only 25 years old. He’d soaked his art and his life in a mystique of violence, selling 6 million albums in the process. Now the two had crashed fatally together.

Newsweek September 23, 1996