50 Years Ago Today Adolf Eichmann, Mastermind Of The Holocaust, Was Sentenced To Death By An Israeli Court. 

The ultimate paradox of the trial of Adolf Eichmann—once chief of the Gestapo’s bureau of “Jewish affairs”—is that no punishment can fit his crime. No mere words can suggest the horrors he committed as an agent of the Third Reich; no mass of personal details seems adequate to explain the enormous wound he inflicted on civilization in the name of Hitler Germany. What Eichmann and the Nazis did to 6 million Jews—as well as to untold members of other human beings—was in the truest sense of the word unthinkable. Yet the unthinkable happened. And beginning this Tuesday morning and continuing for months to come, the world will be forced to relive the obscene tragedy of the Nazi era as it comes to a focus in the figure of one man.

Newsweek April 17, 1961

50 Years Ago Today Adolf Eichmann, Mastermind Of The Holocaust, Was Sentenced To Death By An Israeli Court.

The ultimate paradox of the trial of Adolf Eichmann—once chief of the Gestapo’s bureau of “Jewish affairs”—is that no punishment can fit his crime. No mere words can suggest the horrors he committed as an agent of the Third Reich; no mass of personal details seems adequate to explain the enormous wound he inflicted on civilization in the name of Hitler Germany. What Eichmann and the Nazis did to 6 million Jews—as well as to untold members of other human beings—was in the truest sense of the word unthinkable. Yet the unthinkable happened. And beginning this Tuesday morning and continuing for months to come, the world will be forced to relive the obscene tragedy of the Nazi era as it comes to a focus in the figure of one man.

Newsweek April 17, 1961



Marriages are in decline based on a Pew Research Center analysis, where just 51% of adults 18 and over are married. Here’s our 2006 cover story ‘The Marriage Crunch’, and the notorious cover that inspired it.



Cuban raft survivor, Elián Gonzalez is 18 today. Here’s our story on how the Feds raided his relatives Little Havana home and the reunion with his father.

Estan aqui!” “They’re here! They’re here!” someone cried out. It was just after dawn on Saturday. The Miami relatives of Elian Gonzalez and various of their advisers and hangers-on were awake, or half awake, in the cluttered living room of the small bungalow in Little Havana. Some were sitting around a speakerphone, in negotiations with the Justice Department. Or so they thought, before two federal agents in black body armor jumped the back fence, and eight more burst through the front, firing stinging pepper spray and shouting, “Get down! Get down! Give us the boy!” Elian himself was lying awake on the couch with his great-uncle Lazaro. Donato Dalrymple, the fisherman who first plucked the Miracle Boy out of an inner tube off the Florida coast on Thanksgiving Day, swept Elian into his arms and ran into a bedroom, where he stood in a closet as the boy cowered.

Newsweek May 1, 2000



Scientists have developed an Ebola vaccine, tested on mice, with the hopes of protecting humans. Our 1995 cover story broke down the danger of Ebola and other viruses.

If the word doesn’t make your  hair stand on end, it should.  Discovered just 19 years ago, when  similar outbreaks killed more than 400 people in Zaire and neighboring  Sudan, the Ebola virus remains a gruesome mystery.  No one knows where the virus resides  in nature, how human epidemics get started or why they’re so rare.  We  know only that the virus can spread from person to person through body  secretions, and that 50 to 90 percent of the victims die in a matter of  days.  The first flu-like symptoms typically appear within three days of  infection.  Then, as the virus starts replicating in earnest, the  victim’s capillaries clog with dead blood cells, causing the skin to  bruise, blister and eventually dissolve like wet paper.  By the sixth  day, blood flows freely from the eyes, ears and nose, and the sufferer  starts vomiting the black sludge of his disintegrating internal tissues.   Death usually follows by day nine.

Newsweek May 22, 1995

Scientists have developed an Ebola vaccine, tested on mice, with the hopes of protecting humans. Our 1995 cover story broke down the danger of Ebola and other viruses.

If the word doesn’t make your hair stand on end, it should. Discovered just 19 years ago, when similar outbreaks killed more than 400 people in Zaire and neighboring Sudan, the Ebola virus remains a gruesome mystery. No one knows where the virus resides in nature, how human epidemics get started or why they’re so rare. We know only that the virus can spread from person to person through body secretions, and that 50 to 90 percent of the victims die in a matter of days. The first flu-like symptoms typically appear within three days of infection. Then, as the virus starts replicating in earnest, the victim’s capillaries clog with dead blood cells, causing the skin to bruise, blister and eventually dissolve like wet paper. By the sixth day, blood flows freely from the eyes, ears and nose, and the sufferer starts vomiting the black sludge of his disintegrating internal tissues. Death usually follows by day nine.

Newsweek May 22, 1995



Inspired By The Discovery Of Another Planet Similar To Earth, We Revisit That Wondrous Question

Tricked by his eyes, imprisoned by gravity, fallible, frail, vain, egocentric, man has taken centuries to realize the truth about his place in the universe:

He is one of a thousand forms of life on the crust of a small planet that circles a minor sun on the edge of 100 billion-starred local galaxy.  This galaxy is, in turn, is only one among a billion in the known universe.  Others -extraterrestrials- most possibly exist.

Newsweek February 22, 1960



Before Lehman Brothers, MF Global, or WorldCom, there was Enron. Ten years ago today Enron filed for Chapter 11, the largest corporate bankruptcy at the time. Here’s an excerpt from our 2002 article ‘Who Killed Enron?”

Why did all these people look the other way for so long? Money talks. Or, with Enron, shouts. The company put lots of money in pockets of the people and institutions that were supposed to police it. Enron’s incessant deal-making generated huge fees for Wall Street investment banking houses. And guess what? Wall Street loved Enron, with most analysts rating its stock and bonds as the greatest thing  since money was invented, at least until they finally heard Enron’s death rattle.

Newsweek January 21, 2002

Before Lehman Brothers, MF Global, or WorldCom, there was Enron. Ten years ago today Enron filed for Chapter 11, the largest corporate bankruptcy at the time. Here’s an excerpt from our 2002 article ‘Who Killed Enron?”

Why did all these people look the other way for so long? Money talks. Or, with Enron, shouts. The company put lots of money in pockets of the people and institutions that were supposed to police it. Enron’s incessant deal-making generated huge fees for Wall Street investment banking houses. And guess what? Wall Street loved Enron, with most analysts rating its stock and bonds as the greatest thing since money was invented, at least until they finally heard Enron’s death rattle.

Newsweek January 21, 2002



The AIDS Virus Was Officially Recognized 30 Years Ago Today.  Featuring A Few Of The 16 Covers We’ve Produced.

The deadly disease first broke out in the homosexual communities of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Later, it cropped up among heroin addicts, Haitian refugees and victims of hemophilia. And now, public-health experts fear, the epidemic has spread to infants and even unwary patients receiving blood transfusions. With each new case, they have become more alarmed — particularly because the cause of the illness is unknown.

Experts call the new disease acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), meaning a breakdown in the body’s natural defenses that often leads to fatal forms of cancer and lethal bouts of infection. AIDS was first recognized in 1981. The Centers for Disease Control have now documented 827 cases, with 312 deaths, around the United States. The 38 percent mortality rate makes the disease as menacing as smallpox once was and considerably more deadly than such recent baffling epidemics as Legionnaire’s disease and toxic shock syndrome. Dr. Henry Masur of the National Institutes of Health notes that none of the victims he has studied has lived more than 18 months. “Once they develop a severe case of the disease, I suspect they all die,” he says.

Newsweek December 27, 1982



Mark Twain Would Be 176 Years Old Today

If you take Twain for granted, if you think he’s nothing but a kindly, harmless old gent (and even more harmless for for being dead) , you’re not only wrong—you’re going to get hurt.  A dead bee can sting you and, even from the grave, Twain knows how to sting.

Newsweek August 9, 2010