25th Anniversary of ‘Les Misérables’ On Broadway

"When we started to rehearse the American cast," says Caird, "we did a very interesting exercise. We got the company together, sat in a big circle and said, ‘What we want you all to do is tell us where you all come from, where your parents came from, when they came to America and why." And we found that in most of the cases their ancestors had come to America from Europe — France, Germany, Russia, Poland — at precisely the time of ‘Les Miserables’ for precisely the reasons of injustice, poverty and degradation that Hugo is describing. In many senses the American cast of ‘Les Miserables’ are more truly the children of Victor Hugo than the English cast. And by inference the people coming to see the show in New York will be closer to the events.”

Newsweek March 30, 1987

25th Anniversary of ‘Les Misérables’ On Broadway

"When we started to rehearse the American cast," says Caird, "we did a very interesting exercise. We got the company together, sat in a big circle and said, ‘What we want you all to do is tell us where you all come from, where your parents came from, when they came to America and why." And we found that in most of the cases their ancestors had come to America from Europe — France, Germany, Russia, Poland — at precisely the time of ‘Les Miserables’ for precisely the reasons of injustice, poverty and degradation that Hugo is describing. In many senses the American cast of ‘Les Miserables’ are more truly the children of Victor Hugo than the English cast. And by inference the people coming to see the show in New York will be closer to the events.”

Newsweek March 30, 1987



When he leaned into the microphone, ripped off his black leather jacket and blasted, “Tramps like us, baby, we were born to run,” the Jersey teeny-boppers went wild. After four foot-stomping encores they were ready to crown Bruce Springsteen the great white hope of rock ‘n’ roll.

Newsweek October 27, 1975

The Boss Is Back With A New Album.  Here’s What Critics Are Saying.



New iPad In Stores Soon.   Read Our 2010 Cover. 

But the very simplicity of the iPad masks its transformational power. Some say the iPad heralds a new era of computing, and I’m inclined to believe them. The interface is so intuitive—navigating with your fingers rather than a keyboard and mouse—that it will change what we expect from our computers. Today we talk about “getting on the Internet,” but with iPad you can have a persistent online connection, and that’s a pretty profound shift. Combine the form factor with the 24/7 link to a store, and you have the perfect machine for impulse purchases. The iPad could eventually become your TV, your newspaper, and your bookshelf. Pretty soon, Apple might even become your cable company—sort of—by selling subscriptions, via iTunes, to individual shows or channels.

Newsweek April 5, 2010

New iPad In Stores Soon.   Read Our 2010 Cover.

But the very simplicity of the iPad masks its transformational power. Some say the iPad heralds a new era of computing, and I’m inclined to believe them. The interface is so intuitive—navigating with your fingers rather than a keyboard and mouse—that it will change what we expect from our computers. Today we talk about “getting on the Internet,” but with iPad you can have a persistent online connection, and that’s a pretty profound shift. Combine the form factor with the 24/7 link to a store, and you have the perfect machine for impulse purchases. The iPad could eventually become your TV, your newspaper, and your bookshelf. Pretty soon, Apple might even become your cable company—sort of—by selling subscriptions, via iTunes, to individual shows or channels.

Newsweek April 5, 2010



John Belushi Passed Away 30 Years Ago Today

In New York City, 500 people gathered at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to celebrate the man whose samurai warrior, killer bee, “cheeborger, cheeborger” counterman and crazed bluesman have become hallmarks of a generation’s comedy. Belushi’s brother, Jim, also an actor, began the ceremony: “What a beautiful hall. I can’t help but think John would have loved to play this house. I can see him rolling down the aisle.” While the service provided more laughter than tears, for most spectators, it was Aykroyd’s bittersweet summation that lingered. He said his friend was “a good man, but a bad boy,” someone who needed “an additional illicit thrill to make it all worthwhile.”

Newsweek March 22, 1982

John Belushi Passed Away 30 Years Ago Today

In New York City, 500 people gathered at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to celebrate the man whose samurai warrior, killer bee, “cheeborger, cheeborger” counterman and crazed bluesman have become hallmarks of a generation’s comedy. Belushi’s brother, Jim, also an actor, began the ceremony: “What a beautiful hall. I can’t help but think John would have loved to play this house. I can see him rolling down the aisle.” While the service provided more laughter than tears, for most spectators, it was Aykroyd’s bittersweet summation that lingered. He said his friend was “a good man, but a bad boy,” someone who needed “an additional illicit thrill to make it all worthwhile.”

Newsweek March 22, 1982



Ted Turner Spends His Time With Four Girlfriends.  Read the Hollywood Reporter Profile. 

As a rambunctious sophomore at Brown University, Turner was suspended for getting caught in a women’s dormitory room at nearby Wheaton College. He was suspended again in his senior year, this time for entertaining a Wheaton girl in his room. He was also barred from his fraternity for burning down its homecoming float. “Brown was too much like prep school,” says Turner of his collegiate debacle. “I was expecting it to be more mentally enlightening. My professors just didn’t motivate me.”

Newsweek June 6, 1980

Ted Turner Spends His Time With Four Girlfriends.  Read the Hollywood Reporter Profile.

As a rambunctious sophomore at Brown University, Turner was suspended for getting caught in a women’s dormitory room at nearby Wheaton College. He was suspended again in his senior year, this time for entertaining a Wheaton girl in his room. He was also barred from his fraternity for burning down its homecoming float. “Brown was too much like prep school,” says Turner of his collegiate debacle. “I was expecting it to be more mentally enlightening. My professors just didn’t motivate me.”

Newsweek June 6, 1980