In the U.S., the technetronic age has begun to take shape.  Some 39,500 computers-about 65 per cent of the world’s total-have already begun to reach into every facet of life.

Newsweek January 29, 1968

In the U.S., the technetronic age has begun to take shape.  Some 39,500 computers-about 65 per cent of the world’s total-have already begun to reach into every facet of life.

Newsweek January 29, 1968



Years before he became “Sir” Jonathan Ive, the Apple design guru discussed the secrecy around the iMac and other products.  Read it here. 
SECRECY IS A GOOD Indication of how important something is to a company.  Jonathan Ive,  Apple’s 31-year-old director of industrial design, will tell you that  his team is hard at work on “a whole load of other stuff’ now that the  iMac is out.  But he won’t show you any of this “other stuff.” Nor will  he reveal the exact number of designers who work for him.  Apple execs  ask reporters to keep the location of the design studio — a drab  low-slung building a few blocks from the main campus — confidential for  fear of industrial spying.  Ive says he developed a “habitual paranoia”  about keeping the model of the iMac covered with a large cloth at all  times during the nine months of development.  He wasn’t even supposed to  show it to his wife, Heather, until last week. 
Newsweek May 18, 1998

Years before he became “Sir” Jonathan Ive, the Apple design guru discussed the secrecy around the iMac and other products.  Read it here.

SECRECY IS A GOOD Indication of how important something is to a company. Jonathan Ive, Apple’s 31-year-old director of industrial design, will tell you that his team is hard at work on “a whole load of other stuff’ now that the iMac is out. But he won’t show you any of this “other stuff.” Nor will he reveal the exact number of designers who work for him. Apple execs ask reporters to keep the location of the design studio — a drab low-slung building a few blocks from the main campus — confidential for fear of industrial spying. Ive says he developed a “habitual paranoia” about keeping the model of the iMac covered with a large cloth at all times during the nine months of development. He wasn’t even supposed to show it to his wife, Heather, until last week.

Newsweek May 18, 1998