John Belushi Passed Away 30 Years Ago Today

In New York City, 500 people gathered at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to celebrate the man whose samurai warrior, killer bee, “cheeborger, cheeborger” counterman and crazed bluesman have become hallmarks of a generation’s comedy. Belushi’s brother, Jim, also an actor, began the ceremony: “What a beautiful hall. I can’t help but think John would have loved to play this house. I can see him rolling down the aisle.” While the service provided more laughter than tears, for most spectators, it was Aykroyd’s bittersweet summation that lingered. He said his friend was “a good man, but a bad boy,” someone who needed “an additional illicit thrill to make it all worthwhile.”

Newsweek March 22, 1982

John Belushi Passed Away 30 Years Ago Today

In New York City, 500 people gathered at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to celebrate the man whose samurai warrior, killer bee, “cheeborger, cheeborger” counterman and crazed bluesman have become hallmarks of a generation’s comedy. Belushi’s brother, Jim, also an actor, began the ceremony: “What a beautiful hall. I can’t help but think John would have loved to play this house. I can see him rolling down the aisle.” While the service provided more laughter than tears, for most spectators, it was Aykroyd’s bittersweet summation that lingered. He said his friend was “a good man, but a bad boy,” someone who needed “an additional illicit thrill to make it all worthwhile.”

Newsweek March 22, 1982



The Simpsons Celebrated Their 500th Episode Sunday 

In the opinion of the show’s creator, the Simpsons’ universal appeal begins with their doltish patriarch.  "The world kicks Homer in the ass but he doesn’t resent it," says Matt Groening.  "And that’s because he doesn’t get it.  A lot of people identify with being kicked around, so it’s fun to see someone not understand it and struggle through fairly happily anyway.” Indeed, the appeal of the real may be the show’s prime attraction.

Newsweek April 23, 1990

The Simpsons Celebrated Their 500th Episode Sunday

In the opinion of the show’s creator, the Simpsons’ universal appeal begins with their doltish patriarch.  "The world kicks Homer in the ass but he doesn’t resent it," says Matt Groening.  "And that’s because he doesn’t get it.  A lot of people identify with being kicked around, so it’s fun to see someone not understand it and struggle through fairly happily anyway.” Indeed, the appeal of the real may be the show’s prime attraction.

Newsweek April 23, 1990