Amid concerns, 15 Years Ago Today, British Rule Over Hong Kong Formally Ends

The flights have been booked; TV anchors have staked their places, ready to play supporting roles on one of the most dramatic natural stages in the world.  A few licks of paint aside, all is prepared for a certified Big Media Event.  At midnight on June 30, after 156 years of British rule, Hong Kong returns to China.

Newsweek, May 19, 1997



6/4/1989- Chinese Army Troops Storm Tiananmen Square To Crush The Pro-Democracy Movement. 

Almost to the end, the students thought they could win. As troops closed in on Tiananmen Square before dawn on Sunday, the unarmed protesters defiantly stood their ground.  But two hours later, as gunfire echoed outside the square, the last holdouts gave in to despair. “We can’t let any more blood flow,” someone shouted over the loudspeaker. “We must leave.” The last 1,000 or so students wearily walked out of the square, many of them in tears. At that point the Army stormed down the streets toward Tiananmen — tanks, armored personnel carriers and trucks full of troops, spitting gunfire in all directions. They smashed through the protesters’ frail barricades and charged into the square, where they demolished the students’ provocative statue, “the Goddess of Democracy.” Angry civilians poured into the streets shouting “You beasts! You beasts!” The soldiers shot back, killing 500 to 1,000 people and leaving the democracy movement in ruins.

Newsweek June 12, 1989



Nixon Visits China

The two nations see virtually every other country in the world — with the possible exception of the Soviet Union — through different lenses; some of America’s firmest commitments are to lands, like Japan, that Peking holds to be adversaries. And the conflicting political philosophies and social systems that have been nurtured over the years present obstacles to understanding and wholehearted cooperation that will not be easily surmounted. Yet even at that, Mr. Nixon’s journey achieved the goal of breaking a long silence. It also ushered in a new age of pragmatism that is certain to have an influence around the globe. As one student of foreign affairs suggested: “The talks in Peking could turn out to be one of the hinges of postwar history.”

Newsweek March 6, 1972

Nixon Visits China

The two nations see virtually every other country in the world — with the possible exception of the Soviet Union — through different lenses; some of America’s firmest commitments are to lands, like Japan, that Peking holds to be adversaries. And the conflicting political philosophies and social systems that have been nurtured over the years present obstacles to understanding and wholehearted cooperation that will not be easily surmounted. Yet even at that, Mr. Nixon’s journey achieved the goal of breaking a long silence. It also ushered in a new age of pragmatism that is certain to have an influence around the globe. As one student of foreign affairs suggested: “The talks in Peking could turn out to be one of the hinges of postwar history.”

Newsweek March 6, 1972