It’s Been 13 Years Since Columbine

For a few horrific hours in Littleton. Colo., last week, the school outcasts finally had all the power- and they weilded it without mercy or reason.  As scores of students barricaded themselves in classrooms and closets, praying for deliverance, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold casually decided which of their classmates should live and which should die.

Original Coverage: "Anatomy Of A Massacre" & "Why The Young Kill"

Newsweek May 3, 1999



The Simpsons Celebrated Their 500th Episode Sunday 

In the opinion of the show’s creator, the Simpsons’ universal appeal begins with their doltish patriarch.  "The world kicks Homer in the ass but he doesn’t resent it," says Matt Groening.  "And that’s because he doesn’t get it.  A lot of people identify with being kicked around, so it’s fun to see someone not understand it and struggle through fairly happily anyway.” Indeed, the appeal of the real may be the show’s prime attraction.

Newsweek April 23, 1990

The Simpsons Celebrated Their 500th Episode Sunday

In the opinion of the show’s creator, the Simpsons’ universal appeal begins with their doltish patriarch.  "The world kicks Homer in the ass but he doesn’t resent it," says Matt Groening.  "And that’s because he doesn’t get it.  A lot of people identify with being kicked around, so it’s fun to see someone not understand it and struggle through fairly happily anyway.” Indeed, the appeal of the real may be the show’s prime attraction.

Newsweek April 23, 1990



Serial Killer Jeffrey Dahmer Sentenced To Life In Prison 20 Years Ago.

As it happens, the eyes of Jeffrey Dahmer — hazel, placid, almost vacant — project no sinister gleam. If anything, he looks more like a spacey nerd than a serial killer. But murder is his muse. There is no question about the basic facts in the Dahmer case: at least 15 dismembered bodies; the head in the fridge and heart in the freezer; the blue barrel of acid for leftovers. Dahmer has confessed this to the police. In a Milwaukee courtroom this week, he will sit down, screened from spectators by a wall of bulletproof glass eight feet high, while his defense attorney tries to explain him. The details would chill de Sade: the way he killed Ernest Miller, removing the flesh from his bones and bleaching his skeleton; the time he took Matt Turner home after a Gay Pride parade, drugged him with sleeping pills, strangled him and threw his body into the blue barrel; the occasion he had sex with Oliver Lacy’s corpse. “He talks about killing people just as if it’s like pouring a glass of water,” says Deputy Chief Robert Due of the West Allis Police Department in suburban Milwaukee. “He shows no emotion whatsoever.”  Keep reading (if you dare)

Newsweek February 3, 1992

Serial Killer Jeffrey Dahmer Sentenced To Life In Prison 20 Years Ago.

As it happens, the eyes of Jeffrey Dahmer — hazel, placid, almost vacant — project no sinister gleam. If anything, he looks more like a spacey nerd than a serial killer. But murder is his muse. There is no question about the basic facts in the Dahmer case: at least 15 dismembered bodies; the head in the fridge and heart in the freezer; the blue barrel of acid for leftovers. Dahmer has confessed this to the police. In a Milwaukee courtroom this week, he will sit down, screened from spectators by a wall of bulletproof glass eight feet high, while his defense attorney tries to explain him. The details would chill de Sade: the way he killed Ernest Miller, removing the flesh from his bones and bleaching his skeleton; the time he took Matt Turner home after a Gay Pride parade, drugged him with sleeping pills, strangled him and threw his body into the blue barrel; the occasion he had sex with Oliver Lacy’s corpse. “He talks about killing people just as if it’s like pouring a glass of water,” says Deputy Chief Robert Due of the West Allis Police Department in suburban Milwaukee. “He shows no emotion whatsoever.”  Keep reading (if you dare)

Newsweek February 3, 1992



On This Date In 1990

He had denied using drugs over and over again- to the press, to his constituents, even to a federal grand jury.  But last week, District of Columbia Mayor Marion Barry was caught in an FBI sting operation that seemed to leave him no way out.  Lured to a downtown hotel room by a longtime woman friend, Barry was videotaped buying and smoking crack cocaine.

Newsweek January 29, 1990

On This Date In 1990

He had denied using drugs over and over again- to the press, to his constituents, even to a federal grand jury.  But last week, District of Columbia Mayor Marion Barry was caught in an FBI sting operation that seemed to leave him no way out.  Lured to a downtown hotel room by a longtime woman friend, Barry was videotaped buying and smoking crack cocaine.

Newsweek January 29, 1990



Scientists have developed an Ebola vaccine, tested on mice, with the hopes of protecting humans. Our 1995 cover story broke down the danger of Ebola and other viruses.

If the word doesn’t make your  hair stand on end, it should.  Discovered just 19 years ago, when  similar outbreaks killed more than 400 people in Zaire and neighboring  Sudan, the Ebola virus remains a gruesome mystery.  No one knows where the virus resides  in nature, how human epidemics get started or why they’re so rare.  We  know only that the virus can spread from person to person through body  secretions, and that 50 to 90 percent of the victims die in a matter of  days.  The first flu-like symptoms typically appear within three days of  infection.  Then, as the virus starts replicating in earnest, the  victim’s capillaries clog with dead blood cells, causing the skin to  bruise, blister and eventually dissolve like wet paper.  By the sixth  day, blood flows freely from the eyes, ears and nose, and the sufferer  starts vomiting the black sludge of his disintegrating internal tissues.   Death usually follows by day nine.

Newsweek May 22, 1995

Scientists have developed an Ebola vaccine, tested on mice, with the hopes of protecting humans. Our 1995 cover story broke down the danger of Ebola and other viruses.

If the word doesn’t make your hair stand on end, it should. Discovered just 19 years ago, when similar outbreaks killed more than 400 people in Zaire and neighboring Sudan, the Ebola virus remains a gruesome mystery. No one knows where the virus resides in nature, how human epidemics get started or why they’re so rare. We know only that the virus can spread from person to person through body secretions, and that 50 to 90 percent of the victims die in a matter of days. The first flu-like symptoms typically appear within three days of infection. Then, as the virus starts replicating in earnest, the victim’s capillaries clog with dead blood cells, causing the skin to bruise, blister and eventually dissolve like wet paper. By the sixth day, blood flows freely from the eyes, ears and nose, and the sufferer starts vomiting the black sludge of his disintegrating internal tissues. Death usually follows by day nine.

Newsweek May 22, 1995