The U.S. Embassy In Beirut Was Destroyed By A Suicide Bomber On This Date In 1983

On a rainy April evening late last week, a military transport plane taxied to a halt at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington. As an honor guard stood at attention, the flag-draped coffins of 16 Americans were lowered to the ground. They were the latest victims of the endless killing in Beirut— victims of a mammoth car bomb that shattered the U.S. Embassy in the Lebanese capital five days earlier, injuring 130 people and leaving at least 47 Americans and Lebanese dead in the rubble.

Newsweek May 5, 1983

The U.S. Embassy In Beirut Was Destroyed By A Suicide Bomber On This Date In 1983

On a rainy April evening late last week, a military transport plane taxied to a halt at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington. As an honor guard stood at attention, the flag-draped coffins of 16 Americans were lowered to the ground. They were the latest victims of the endless killing in Beirut— victims of a mammoth car bomb that shattered the U.S. Embassy in the Lebanese capital five days earlier, injuring 130 people and leaving at least 47 Americans and Lebanese dead in the rubble.

Newsweek May 5, 1983



25th Anniversary of ‘Les Misérables’ On Broadway

"When we started to rehearse the American cast," says Caird, "we did a very interesting exercise. We got the company together, sat in a big circle and said, ‘What we want you all to do is tell us where you all come from, where your parents came from, when they came to America and why." And we found that in most of the cases their ancestors had come to America from Europe — France, Germany, Russia, Poland — at precisely the time of ‘Les Miserables’ for precisely the reasons of injustice, poverty and degradation that Hugo is describing. In many senses the American cast of ‘Les Miserables’ are more truly the children of Victor Hugo than the English cast. And by inference the people coming to see the show in New York will be closer to the events.”

Newsweek March 30, 1987

25th Anniversary of ‘Les Misérables’ On Broadway

"When we started to rehearse the American cast," says Caird, "we did a very interesting exercise. We got the company together, sat in a big circle and said, ‘What we want you all to do is tell us where you all come from, where your parents came from, when they came to America and why." And we found that in most of the cases their ancestors had come to America from Europe — France, Germany, Russia, Poland — at precisely the time of ‘Les Miserables’ for precisely the reasons of injustice, poverty and degradation that Hugo is describing. In many senses the American cast of ‘Les Miserables’ are more truly the children of Victor Hugo than the English cast. And by inference the people coming to see the show in New York will be closer to the events.”

Newsweek March 30, 1987



Ted Turner Spends His Time With Four Girlfriends.  Read the Hollywood Reporter Profile. 

As a rambunctious sophomore at Brown University, Turner was suspended for getting caught in a women’s dormitory room at nearby Wheaton College. He was suspended again in his senior year, this time for entertaining a Wheaton girl in his room. He was also barred from his fraternity for burning down its homecoming float. “Brown was too much like prep school,” says Turner of his collegiate debacle. “I was expecting it to be more mentally enlightening. My professors just didn’t motivate me.”

Newsweek June 6, 1980

Ted Turner Spends His Time With Four Girlfriends.  Read the Hollywood Reporter Profile.

As a rambunctious sophomore at Brown University, Turner was suspended for getting caught in a women’s dormitory room at nearby Wheaton College. He was suspended again in his senior year, this time for entertaining a Wheaton girl in his room. He was also barred from his fraternity for burning down its homecoming float. “Brown was too much like prep school,” says Turner of his collegiate debacle. “I was expecting it to be more mentally enlightening. My professors just didn’t motivate me.”

Newsweek June 6, 1980



Today Is The 25th Anniversary Of Andy Warhol’s Death

In 1968 Andy Warhol was shot and gravely wounded by a disturbed woman.  “When I got shot,”  he wrote later, “two bullets went through my stomach, liver, spleen,  esophagus, left lung and right lung.  The doctors and everyone else,  including me, were sure I was going to die, so we all got ready, and  then I didn’t do it.  But I always wished I had died, and I still wish  that, because I could have gotten the whole thing over with.”

Newsweek March 9, 1987

Today Is The 25th Anniversary Of Andy Warhol’s Death

In 1968 Andy Warhol was shot and gravely wounded by a disturbed woman. “When I got shot,” he wrote later, “two bullets went through my stomach, liver, spleen, esophagus, left lung and right lung. The doctors and everyone else, including me, were sure I was going to die, so we all got ready, and then I didn’t do it. But I always wished I had died, and I still wish that, because I could have gotten the whole thing over with.”

Newsweek March 9, 1987



Meryl Streep appears in this week’s Newsweek cover story discussing her latest film ‘The Iron Lady’, based on the life of Margaret Thatcher. Meryl graced our Newsweek cover back in 1980, here’s an excerpt:

The face is beautiful but anguished, haunted by sorrow, despair,determination and love. Can one face express all these warring emotions, with a grave dignity that adds a deeper beauty to the physical structure? Meryl Streep’s face can and does in the extraordinary first image of Kramer Vs. Kramer. This first shot of a superbly crafted film prints indelibly upon the eyes and consciousness of the audience the face of a young actress who, at 30, may become the strongest performer of her generation, the first American woman since Jane Fonda to rival the power, versatility and impact of such male stars as Dustin Hoffman, Jack Nicholson, Robert De Niro and Al Pacino.

Newsweek January 7, 1980



Marriages are in decline based on a Pew Research Center analysis, where just 51% of adults 18 and over are married. Here’s our 2006 cover story ‘The Marriage Crunch’, and the notorious cover that inspired it.



A French appeals court today ruled that former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega can be extradited back to this homeland, last seen in 1990. Below is an excerpt from a 1988 profile on Noriega, also referred to as ‘pineapple face’. 

With  a personal fortune estimated at anywhere between $ 200 million and $ 1  billion, Noriega tries to present himself as a cultured man.  He likes  to read and to drop names of books; he hands out Cuban cigars with his  name embossed on them.  His luxurious home is filled with fine art and  expensive furniture.  On an official salary of $ 40,000 per year, he has  a fleet of BMW’s, an apartment in Paris and a chateau in southern  France.  He owns property in Spain, Japan and Israel, as well as more  than a dozen buildings in Panama.  Noriega is vain enough to have gone  to Switzerland in 1982 to try to have his corrugated skin smoothed —  and, after being taunted as cara pina (pineapple face), he is touchy  enough to have pushed a law making such offensive remarks about public  officials punishable by up to two years in jail.  He lies about his age,  claiming to be several years younger than his mid-50s.

A French appeals court today ruled that former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega can be extradited back to this homeland, last seen in 1990. Below is an excerpt from a 1988 profile on Noriega, also referred to as ‘pineapple face’.

With a personal fortune estimated at anywhere between $ 200 million and $ 1 billion, Noriega tries to present himself as a cultured man. He likes to read and to drop names of books; he hands out Cuban cigars with his name embossed on them. His luxurious home is filled with fine art and expensive furniture. On an official salary of $ 40,000 per year, he has a fleet of BMW’s, an apartment in Paris and a chateau in southern France. He owns property in Spain, Japan and Israel, as well as more than a dozen buildings in Panama. Noriega is vain enough to have gone to Switzerland in 1982 to try to have his corrugated skin smoothed — and, after being taunted as cara pina (pineapple face), he is touchy enough to have pushed a law making such offensive remarks about public officials punishable by up to two years in jail. He lies about his age, claiming to be several years younger than his mid-50s.



On This Date in 1986 — Iron Mike Tyson Crowned Heavyweight Champion.

He is black granite in motion. Mike Tyson, 20, last week became the youngest heavyweight champ in history when he knocked out Trevor Berbick in Las Vegas. At the end, in the second round, Berbick was dazed and stumbling around the ring. “At that particular point, I was throwing, what can I say, hydrogen bombs — heavy punches with murderous intention, the 221-pound Tyson said later.

Newsweek December 8, 1986

On This Date in 1986 — Iron Mike Tyson Crowned Heavyweight Champion.

He is black granite in motion. Mike Tyson, 20, last week became the youngest heavyweight champ in history when he knocked out Trevor Berbick in Las Vegas. At the end, in the second round, Berbick was dazed and stumbling around the ring. “At that particular point, I was throwing, what can I say, hydrogen bombs — heavy punches with murderous intention, the 221-pound Tyson said later.

Newsweek December 8, 1986